Research & Theory

Public Heatlh and Media Literacy

Public health has long been a topic addressed through media literacy - whether the issues are violence prevention, sexuality, smoking cessation or any other health concern. Interviews with Erica Rosenthal from Hollywood, Health and Society and Narges Dorratoltaj from Ctrl+S explore how public health and media literacy intersect. 

 

Empowerment: From Theory to Practice to Activism

In this issue of Connections, we illustrate how theory, practice and activism work together through current research and implementation programs being conducted at the University of Southern California (USC).  We feature a dialogue between Henry Jenkins, a leading media scholar and Provost Professor of Communication, Journalism, and the USC School of Cinematic Arts, and CML’s Director, Tessa Jolls.  Their conversation focuses on David Bordwell’s insightful film theory and how it informs today’s media literacy work.

ESL and Media Literacy

While teaching English as a second language isn’t often a focus of discussions for media literacy, the number of ESL students alone should argue for more emphasis and visibility for this educational imperative. CML interviewed Raul Alberto Mora, Ph.D., who emphasizes language learning and critical media literacy in his work with university students and preservice teachers in Medellin, Colombia, as well as Camilo Andres Dominguez-Cruz, a native of Colombia, who now teaches ESL in a North Carolina primary school, Sallie B. Howard School for the Arts and Education. 
 

Confirmation Bias and Media Literacy

This issue of Connections explores confirmation bias and the role it plays in our decision-making process. We interviewed professor Jason Ohler who says, “confirmation bias is fake news’ best friend.”  We also introduce our new CML Fellow and Affiliate Michele Johnsen.   Note correction:  the famous bias study cited as a resource was authored by Albert Hastorf and Hadley Cantril. 

Trust Through Technology?

Should we place hope in technology for solving some of the problems technology helped create? Maybe. One approach worth looking at is BlockChain (distributed ledger technology) which might help to solve the riddle of where information originates, and how it morphs and proliferates.  CML interviewed Ian O’Byrne, internationally recognized educator and researcher, on the topic of BlockChain technology and its connections to media literacy. 

Leadership for Media Literacy: Elizabeth Thoman

This issue pays tribute to the leadership and vision of Elizabeth Thoman, CML Founder and media literacy pioneer. Media literacy collegues expressed their gratitude for Thoman’s courage and commitment to the field of media literacy, and expressed optimism in building upon her vision and legacy.  Included is an introduction by Ann McMullen on leadership, and reflections by Dr. Henry Jenkins, University of Southern California (USC), and Dr. Bobbie Eisenstock, California State University, Northridge (CSUN).  MediaLit Moments activity is based upon Elizabeth Thoman's "feminist currency."

Education and The Creative Economy: Australia

This month we continue to explore Education and The Creative Economy by featuring exciting initiatives being undertaken in Australia, where media literacy is now embedded in the national curriculum through media arts, and where the Australian government has prioritized supporting and growing the creative economy.  CML interviewed two Australian education/media literacy leaders, one who works in higher education – Michael Dezuanni -- and the other in secondary education, Roger Dunscombe.

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